Beer Revolution in London

by | Jul 3, 2014 | Article

London has been a beer and brewing city for centuries.  The very fabric of London is based around beer.  Pubs are on every other corner, breweries are scattered across this great city and you are not a proper Londoner unless you head to the pub for a pint after work on a Friday.

However, since the Second World War, to the pessimist, London’s beer culture has been in seemingly terminal decline. Some of the world most famous breweries had closed or moved, such as Young’s Wandsworth brewery – London’s oldest, or Truman’s Brick Lane brewery – once the world’s biggest. By the mid 2000s the number of breweries in London had dropped to no more than a handful including the monster Budweiser producing Mortlake brewery. This, coupled with pubs closing at an alarming rate, meant that the world of beer was not looking good in London.

But in 2000 the Meantime Brewery in Greenwich started up, and while everything else in London seemed to be disappearing beer wise (especially after the sale of the Young’s Brewery in Wandsworth), was at the vanguard of the new generation of London breweries that have taken the city by storm. In the last 8 years over 80 new breweries have opened up within the M25 area and the rate of new openings does not seem to be diminishing. Admittedly some of these breweries are brew pubs that are only brewing for consumption on the premises, but the turn-around has been breathtaking.

What is also remarkable is the change in demographic in beer drinkers. Serious beer is no longer the preserve of men who are 50 plus who are CAMRA members. The new generation of drinkers are majority below 35 with far more women drinking beer than before. This trend is most noticeable when you go to trend setting areas such as Dalston or Hackney, where street food festivals are busting at the seams with 20-35 year olds washing down their kimchi topped pulled pork sliders with new wave London brewed IPA.

This has been a truly grassroots movement, not brought about by slick advertising campaigns, but rather people wanting to discover something new, flavourful, good quality which has got provenance. Having a beer which is brewed locally to where you live seems to be very attractive many people too, with several breweries naming themselves after their area.

So in 2014, we find ourselves as Londoners rediscovering what we have had for centuries: a wonderful, vibrant brewing and beer scene, brewing the same styles of beer that we’ve always done, IPAs, porters, pale ales and stouts.

For more information and to get in touch with BBB – for all your beer needs

 

LATEST NEWS…

Craft Gin Club

Craft Gin Club

Manly Spirits Launches in UK's biggest gin subscription Craft Gin Club Craft Gin Club is the UK's largest online gin subscription club with over 33k members (August 2019) from all corners of the UK. Boutique Bar Brands worked closely with Craft Clubs for around a year...

read more
The London Distillery Company joins BBB’s portfolio

The London Distillery Company joins BBB’s portfolio

Here at BBB, we are delighted to announce that The London Distillery Company (TLDC) has appointed BBB as their exclusive distributor for Great Britain. While the TLDC range is currently widely available in the premium on-trade around London as well as via Fortnum...

read more
The Gin Guide Finalists Announced

The Gin Guide Finalists Announced

THE GIN GUIDE AWARDS 2019 - FINALISTS Following an intensive period of tasting and judging by 10 expert judges, The Gin Guide Awards 2019 list of finalists has been announced.  We are delighted that Manly Spirits Australian Dry Gin received high enough scores across...

read more
GQ names Coastal Citrus Gin as one of the best for a G&T

GQ names Coastal Citrus Gin as one of the best for a G&T

In March, GQ published its guide to the best gins to make the perfect gin and tonic.  We are delighted that out of the many thousands of gins they could choose, the featured Manly Spirits Coastal Citrus gin.  They even took it one step further recommending that is...

read more